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20121201
20121231
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-- commander of the western flotilla and to general u.s. grant in the winter of 1862 because they work together to capture fort henry, for donaldson, and the tributaries of the mississippi river. then foot was on his own for a while working with john pope, and that worked out pretty well, too. when they captured the island in april 1862. part of this sequence of union successes in the spring of 1862 which then did come to an end, so if there is informal cooperation between the two of them it works pretty well. but as they see themselves as rivals, it's not going to work. >> look at halleck and grant in 1862. halleck is worrying about grant. >> give us a sense of the state of, the evolving state in terms of shifting and as 1861 most 1862 and sort of changes, radically in terms of enlistme enlistment. >> start with me? yeah, one of the things about the civil war, and i think it's particularly to the civil war navies, it's a tonic pivot point in history. things have been changing for some time. the telegraph comes in in the 1840s but railroads already expanding across the continent. but the applic
" launched its own e-book called u.s.a. tomorrow. a publisher that any stripe can come to market very early in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years fro
atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populace cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and wha
work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> maybe but mostly because it becomes a grievance. individual grievances interfering with reconciliation with between countries. >> despite the fact that it was really jennings and some of his co-workers who followed through on the actual rescue that is why i would never say is fair to give dolley madison the credit because her patriotic impulse to make sure that didn't happen that led to the rescue of the portrait. if you go to see one of these portraits of george washington painted by gilbert stuart there is the one in the east room that is there today because of the action of jennings and others but also another one that is in the national portrait gallery. it is 95 inches high. you don't know until you look at it was an effort of work had to be to remove it from the wall. .. >> this event was par
looked out the day she said i think there is something when he was shown the design of the u.s.s. monitor because didn't get a ride in the nick of time to create the most famous naval engagement of the war? but i want to go beyond that because we have spent time in our time here at the historical society talking about that epic battle, that epic duel 150 years ago. but, he famously said it was the end of the wooden navy and the walls would fall after that, and then the guy that both of you right so much about in your books, and i think you both like camelot, not young or glamorous in his adventures. tell me what impresses you the most about the surrogate and then each of you has to tell me whether she really said it or he didn't say it. [laughter] >> the thing about surrogate, there are several things and i will start with a whole question of loyalty. one of the problems in 1861 when the war began as the officers enlisted them for that matter but in particular they had to decide whether loyalty laid. whether it was with the state or the national government and one clear difference in the
constitution one of the things they are told is the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution the made a number of crucial changes and one of them was that they had it won german executives and i believe was up a five-year executive term. >> professor, was there a lot of political insight during the war in the south? >> there were no political parties. none of the things that interest in the party is it quickly was on the ropes and never really materialized. there was political opposition but it was in a quick kind of format. theoretically, everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican ticket you couldn't vote for a lincoln and certainly in the deep south, but they were all aligned with the southern wing of the democratic party and aprendo war the opposition rose and some of the more profoundly opposed to the davis administration on very good grounds it was a federally concentrated power regime of the entirety of american history. one looked at the union government, the structure of the states and the federal government in the union in th
in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited
next on booktv, robert watson looks at the history of scandal surrounding the intimate lives of u.s. presidents since 1789. this is a little under one hour. [applause] >> okay, can everyone hear me okay? i am robert watson. thanks for coming. welcome to lynn university, site of the third and final presidential debate this past the over 20 seconds and a quick note on some of those awards that i won for specific specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different ang
was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation because jefferson didn't act on it quickly enough. he had in his hand a letter from kosciuszko saying that whatever you may for here from europe, might intention for my american funds remains fixed, meaning that kosciuszko, that his intentions to have that money used by mr. jefferson to free mr. jefferson slaves remains fixed. now, if mr. thomas jefferson walked into the county courthouse carrying kosciuszko's will, caring and letter from kosciuszko business i want is acted upon, do you think the court is going to delay? well, only because jefferson didn't press it. he didn't want to press it. anything else? billy speakers access to money -- [inaudible] income were going to john barnes account on which jefferson help held
by a team from the u.s. army air corps, a warplane so that guaranteed that somebody would finish. is that dangerous. there were several national teams trying to do it at this time. the good news was none of them were killed but then that bad news was none of them finish. it was actually quite difficult. in the early planes, the weather, whatever it was all the way around the world so there were these attempts to go-round, to fly around the world and in fact very quickly by the 1930's somebody does it within eight days. it's really kind of an amazing record. and it's hard to break that. if you go faster, it's not quite the endurance test as much as you would need to fly around the world. at what happens with that eight day record being set is people start to notice that it's not really what we would call a great circle, the equivalent is greater. people were sticking to the hemisphere where they could get that -- a million earhart said i'm going to do it around the equator as much as possible so she was doing something much more difficult that no one tested and that really was qui
the u.s. house of representatives." do you look for the books when they come out by members of congress or politicians? >> guest: i mean, i certainly note them, but i feel as if, at least from my stand point, that the books are a way to entrench members of congress, not just in their positions, but, also, potentially, to position them for future runs be it within their current offices or maybe something different so it seems as if it's more of a calling card than it is furthering their career as authors. certainly, being authors of books is yet another feather in the cap of politicians so it's just a way of announcing to the larger public that they are part of the larger conversation. .. >> we paid attention to the mark rubio book when he was touted as the vice presidential candidate then we lost interest. he has a future in the republican party. it will come back. >> host: well known for members and officials have written books including colin powell, madeleine albright another book "prague winter" and the late senator arlen specter had a book out in april 2020 -- 2012 "life among the
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
, for the u.s. government, he is part of that but there are things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder. where he for instance puts a ruler, a ruler underneath a rock that talks about, that has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled. and then you are thinking, and he is making fun of his survey captains but the great thing is, we don't really know what he thought and he didn't leave much at all. >> we will be done with him for sure. >> so we will open the floor to questions. jack, what is your question? >> hi. a great talk, really enjoyed it. a two-parter. is the -- still around and the historical preservation office? >> well, the agent block is still around. where is a? there is a conference about it recently, and maybe three years ago at the india house but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time jamie kelly founded at the aquarium that robert moses was knocking down, he got it somewhere. maybe it's the historical society. i don't now remember it is but no, should have contacted them. i called the borough historian but it did not take. yea
are placed. and so when he goes out, went also then goes out on surveys for the u.s. government, he's part of that, but there's things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder, when he, for instance, put the rover, ruler underneath a rock that talks about, but has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled, and then you are thinking come he's kind of making fun of this survey. but the great thing is, we do really now what he thought. >> so, we open the floor to questions. jack, what's your question? >> hi. interesting talk, enjoyed it. is the atrium block still around? >> well, the atrium block is still around. where is it? there was a conference about it recently. maybe a few years ago. but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time kelly founded at the aquarium that robert louis was knocking down, he got it somewhere. a historical site. i don't know now where it is. i know i should have talked to them. i called the baroque historian -- borough historian. >> i want to ask a question. does every borough had a historic? >> i think so. i think there's a
a matter of economic security as well as health security. in the u.s. demands for medical care is the social right originated in the workers movement who represented by people like florence greenberg. they next came to national prominence and fcr its proposed second bill of rights and finally they were adopted in the united nations universal declaration of human rights after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who hoped draft the u.n. declaration after her husband's death. today more than 70 countries recognize the right to health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation has taken steps to implement these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. >> mother joan's washington bureau chief, david corn, his most recent book is called showdown, the inside story of how obama fought back cantor and the tea party. is the showdown referring to any specific incident or just politics in general mr. corn? >> will
of independence that we saw yesterday in the presentation and the u.s. flag that flew over fort mchenry. she will kill me for putting it this way, but prepare yourself for book history csi. [applause] >> it has been such an amazing privilege of the last two days to build the knowledge that has been brought together at the summit. it was discussed yesterday and seemed to be a continuing theme throughout that the resources of knowledge that leads to new christians, it can't be just information. it must be knowledge. in the preservation, in short of an interrupted exit either an original or reformulated form. very nicely ties in with the use of new technology and how we actually access that content. spectral imaging and other non invasive technologies we can access not visible information and change the information into content knowledge from our book. we can create accurate digital rendering of the intermission and make it more accessible in the digital object. the find it interesting because if we did not have the original material we could not use the new technology to pull up the informatio
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16